• Quotations

     

                A primary element of the Shakespearean tragedy is the tragic hero.  By definition, the tragic hero is a character of nobility (of a noble birth) or of a high stature.  In Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, Hamlet is the prince of Denmark, the son of Queen Gertrude and King Hamlet.  Hamlet’s stature is repeatedly disclosed to the audience through Polonius’ conversation in Scene II, lines 202

    Polonius: Do you know me, my lord?
    Hamlet: Excellent well; you're a fishmonger.
    Polonius: Not I, my lord.
    Hamlet Then I would you were so honest a man. (55)

    Although, Polonius does not call Hamlet prince, he does refer to him as “lord.”  Furthermore in the Sophoclean play

     

    Oedipus Rex, the reader is made aware that Oedipus is the King of Thebes through various conversations.  One  conversation between the priest and Oedipus has the priest stating, “Great Oedipus, O powerful King of Thebes” (Sophocles, 205).  This coversation sets the stage for Oedipus to once again become the savior of Thebes. …………
     
    Using Elipses

    Shakespeare illustrates Hamlet’s indecisiveness through a soliloquy in Act II Scene II:

                            Now I am a alone.

                            O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!

                            Is it not monstrous that this player here,

                            But in a fiction, in a dream of passion,

                            Could force his soul so to his own conceit

                            . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

                            Wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the King. (547-551, 605)

    Or

    Now I am a alone.

                            O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!

                            Is it not monstrous that this player here,

                            But in a fiction, in a dream of passion,

                            Could force his soul so to his own conceit. . . . (547-551)

     

     

Last Modified on November 30, 2007