• Photography Help Sheets
     
     

    Photography I: Buying A Camera (KEH.com style)

    Mr. Bricker

     

     

    For this course, you will be using a manual SLR (single lens reflex) camera.  What that means is simple: You will be the one who decides the settings: the aperture, the shutter speed, and various other settings.  These cameras are not like the digital cameras that most of you own.  The camera will take great photographs, IF the photographer knows what he or she is doing……I hope that you grow to appreciate the process of creating a beautiful photograph, from beginning to end. 

     

    Here are some examples of cameras from the KEH website, as well as some recommendations.  I suggest KEH or B&H photo over sites such as eBay because they grade their cameras (see other sheet) and offer both warranties and product support.  With eBay, you never know exactly what you are going to get, which is especially dangerous if you are inexperienced with cameras.  Amazon is a pretty reliable site as well, but please be sure to check seller ratings and reviews.  (I will be glad to help students navigate this process!)

     

    How to navigate the KEH.com website

     

    Go to “The Camera Store” link and investigate what they have to offer.  The company’s inventory is constantly changing…..feel free to check back frequently.  Focus on brands AND “manual” cameras.  Below you will find a few example products, as well as cameras that I would recommend for this course. Feel free to ask questions or to run things by me……

     

    Example Product:

     

    Camera Body: (Just the body, no lens, etc.)

    Pentax Manual Focus

    K1000 35MM SLR MANUAL FOCUS CAMERA BODY

     

     k1000

     

     

    Grade    

     

    LN- $235.00      

    EX+ $165.00      

    EX   $129.00      

    BGN $69.00   

                           

             

    Uses K bayonet mount lenses and 1-MS76 battery. Same as KM except it has no self timer or DOF preview.

     

    Classic and popular camera, offering: Manual focus, TTL metering, manual metering only, Cds metering cells, Center weighted metering pattern (full frame), single needle meter display in VF, hot shoe and PC sync terminal (X only).

     

    * Shutter speed range: 1 sec - 1/1000 plus B

     

    * Batteries operate meter only, all shutter speeds are mechanical.

     

    * Flash sync at 1/60

     

    * ISO film speed range: 20-3200, set manually

     

    * Manual film advance and rewind

     

    • Mechanical cable release socket
    •  

     

    LENS: (Example)
     
    lens

     

    EX   $199.00

     

    Or, look for an “outfit.”  Includes camera AND lens, and often some other accessories.  For example:

     

    Pentax Manual Focus

    K1000 SE BLACK LEATHER WITH 50 F1.4 SMC M (49) 35MM SLR MANUAL FOCUS CAMERA OUTFIT

    |

     full body   

    Grade

    EX   $274.00      

    BGN $161.00      

    UG   $86.00       

        

    Uses K bayonet mount lenses. Same as KM except it has no self timer or DOF preview. Classic and popular camera, offering: Manual focus, TTL metering, manual metering only, Cds metering cells, Center weighted metering pattern (full frame), single needle meter display in VF, hot shoe and PC sync terminal (X only).

     

    Shutter speed range: 1 sec - 1/1000 plus B.

     

    Batteries operate meter only, all shutter speeds are mechanical.

     

    Flash sync at 1/60.

     

    ISO film speed range: 20-3200, set manually.

     

    Manual film advance and rewind.

     

    Mechanical cable release socket.

     

    Shutter cock indicator.

     

    Uses 1-MS76 battery.

     

     

    Some cameras I would recommend for this course (and future endeavors):

     

    Pentax K1000 (a classic)

    Pentax P30T (very similar to the K1000, but more modern AND cheaper…I have 2 of them….LOVE THEM)

    Nikon EL2

    Nikon F2 Photomic (A bit more $, but NICE)

    Canon A1

    Canon AE1

    Canon F1 (Again, a bit more money…but you get what you pay for)

    Minolta SRT 102 (Less money, but still a quality camera)

    Olympus OM1

     

    Because I have had much success with Pentax manual cameras, I will always favor those.  However, these other brands will be just fine for this course.  We will have a few cameras for you to try out…..feel free to do your own research online.  The bottom line is this: You need to be comfortable with and confident in the camera you are using.  The end result (your print) will always be more about your effort than the camera with which you shot it.   
     
    KEH.com Grading System
     

    We believe that our grading system is the best in the industry and offers an option for every taste and budget. We strive to provide clear, accurate descriptions of each grade so you will know what to expect when you buy from us. When you trade or sell your equipment to us, we evaluate it using the same criteria. All used equipment is guaranteed to work, regardless of its cosmetic condition and is covered by KEH’s 60 day warranty.

    NEW   As packaged by manufacturer. Manufacturer’s USA warranty. Never used or owned by a consumer.

    NEW DEMO   As packaged by manufacturer. Manufacturer’s USA warranty. Never owned by a consumer but used as demonstration equipment. May show various stages of wear including slight dings or pecks.

    LN   "Like New" Perfect. Includes original box and instructions and any manufacturer provided accessories.

    LN-   "Like New Minus" 97-99% of original condition. Extremely slight wear that can only be seen upon very close inspection. Box and accessories not included.

    EX+   "Excellent Plus" 90-96% of the original condition. Shows moderate wear. May have slight marks on finish. Glass very clean.

    EX   "Excellent" 80-89% of the original condition. Shows moderate wear. May have small dings, pecks and slight finish wear. Glass may have some dust, but no marks.

    BGN   "Bargain" 70-79% of original condition. Shows more than average wear. May have dents, dings and a goodly amount of brassing and finish loss. Glass may have marks that should not affect picture quality.

    UG   "Ugly" Very rough looking. Multiple impressions in metal, excessive finish loss and brassing are likely. Glass will have marks, fungus or haze that will probably affect picture quality.

     

    ACCESSORIES INCLUDED:
    • NEW and LN as packaged by manufacturer. Manufacturer or distributor does not always provide straps, batteries, caps, shades, etc.

    • Instruction books, caps, batteries, cases and straps sold separately for all other grades.

     

     
    advice
     
    developing
     
    exposuresheet
     
    cheat1
    cheat2

    Enlarging

     

    1.     Place negative in carrier with emulsion side (dull) down and with bottom of the photograph away from you. 

    2.     Make sure your easel is placed under the enlarger.

    3.     Switch on the enlarger.  Turn aperture (f-stop) to its brightest setting.  Focus your negative using the knob on the side of the enlarger.  You can also raise or lower the enlarger to better accommodate your print area.  In other words, adjust the height until the image fills the frame of the easel.

    4.     Adjust your aperture to a less bright setting.  (Close it down.)  I would suggest trying f/11.

    5.     Switch off the enlarger.

    6.     Make a test strip by using a small piece of photographic paper.

    7.     Make successive exposures by moving your piece of cardboard over the paper, each one equal to the last.  Start your timer for 15 seconds, and move the cardboard every 3 seconds (15,12,9,6,3).

    8.     Analyze the test print to determine which exposure time is best.  (It can be between the strips….for example….10 seconds.)  You want to see a pure black, a pure white, and many grays in between.  If your image is too flat and needs contrast, consider using a filter.  (See darkroom advice sheet for more on this.)  If you use a filter, do another test strip testing that filter or any others until you achieve your desired results.

    9.     You are now ready to print your final piece.  Place your paper in the easel and expose for the desired time. 

    10.   Process with the chemicals.  Good work!

     

    Composition

     

                   anna1        anna2 

     

     

    What does the word “composition” refer to?

     

    Composition, the act of composing the image in the viewfinder, is a visual process of organizing the elements and individual details of a scene into a balanced and pleasing arrangement.

     

    Is there one “right” composition?

     

    No.  Composition is often a matter of opinion and taste.  However, there is the old saying, “I don’t know what I like, but I do know what I don’t like.”  A lot of times, we can look at a photograph and see that it is framed poorly, that something is intruding, the action isn’t captured, or the subject could be portrayed in a much stronger manner.

     

    A composition that conveys a photographer's intended meaning is an effective one. A composition that doesn't or that confuses the viewer is not.

     

    If the photographer “frames” a photograph poorly when taking it, is there any way to create a better composition in the darkroom?

     

    Definitely.  Investigate the terms below to find some ways.  We will also discuss how to create a stronger composition in the darkroom in the coming days.

     

    Define the following terms, in regard to composition:

     

    Rule of thirds, diagonals, viewpoint, perspective, and cropping.

     

    For next class, locate two examples.  One should be of a composition you feel to be strong, and one should a composition that you feel is lacking.  Be prepared to discuss and defend your choices.    

     

     

     
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